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Curated research library of TV news clips regarding the NSA, its oversight and privacy issues, 2009-2014

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Primary curation & research: Robin Chin, Internet Archive TV News Researcher; using TV News Archive service.

Speakers

Lincoln Chafee
Former U.S. Senator (R-RI)and-Governor (I-RI)
CNNW 10/13/2015
Cooper: Governor Chafee, you and Hillary Clinton both voted for The Patriot Act which created the NSA surveillance program, you emphasized civil liberties and privacy during your campaign. Aren’t these two things in conflict? Chafee: No, that was another 99-1 vote, for The Patriot Act. And it was seen as, at the time, modernizing our ability to do what we’ve always done, to tap phones which always require a warrant that Cooper: (inaudible) that? Chafee: No, no. As long as you're getting a warrant, I believe that under the 4th Amendment you should be able to do surveillance. But you need a warrant. That’s what the 4th Amendment says. And in The Patriot Act, section 215 started to get broadened too far. So I would be in favor of addressing and reforming section 215 of The Patriot Act.
Hillary Clinton
Former U.S. Secretary of State,-U.S. Senator (D-NY) and First Lady
CNNW 10/13/2015
Cooper: Secretary Clinton do you regret your vote on The Patriot Act? Clinton: No, I don't. I think that it was necessary to make sure that we were able after 9/11 to put in place the security that we needed, and it is true that it did require that there be a process. What happened, however, is that the bush administration began to chip away at that process and I began to speak out about their use of warrantless surveillance and the other behavior that they engaged in. we always have to keep the balance of civil liberties, privacy and security. It’s not easy in a democracy but we have to keep it in mind.
Bernie Sanders
U.S. Senator (I- Vermont),
CNNW 10/13/2015
Cooper: Senator Sanders, you're the only one on this stage who voted against The Patriot Act. Sanders: Was it 99 to 1? Applause. Cooper: And the reauthorization votes. Let me ask you, if elected, would you shut down the NSA surveillance program? Sanders: I’m sorry. Cooper: Would you shut down the NSA surveillance program? Sanders: Absolutely, of course. Cooper: You would? Sanders: Well, I would shut down, I would shut down what exists right now is that virtually every telephone call in this country ends up in a file at the NSA. That is unacceptable to me. But it's not just government surveillance. I think the government is involved in our e-mails, is involved in our web sites, corporate America is doing it as well. If we are a free country, we have the right to be free. Yes, we have to defend ourselves against terrorism, but there are ways to do that without impinging on our constitutional rights and our privacy rights.
Lincoln Chafee
Former U.S. Senator (R-RI)and-Governor (I-RI)
CNNW 10/13/2015
Cooper: Governor Chafee, Edward Snowden, is he a traitor or hero? Chafee: No, I would bring him home. The courts have ruled that what he did was, what he did was, Cooper: bring him home. No jail time? Chafee: The American government was acting illegally. That's what the federal courts have said. What Snowden did showed that the American government was acting illegally.
Hillary Clinton
Former U.S. Secretary of State,-U.S. Senator (D-NY) and First Lady
CNNW 10/13/2015
Cooper: Senator Clinton. Hero or a traitor? Clinton: He broke the laws of the United States. He could have been a whistleblower, he could have gotten all the protections of being a whistleblower . He could have raised all the issues that he has raised and I think there would have been a positive response to that. Cooper: Should he do jail time? Clinton: In addition, he stole very important information that has unfortunately fallen into a lot of the wrong hands. So I don't think he should be brought home without facing the music.
Martin O'Malley
Former Gov. of Maryland
CNNW 10/13/2015
Governor O'Malley, Snowden. O’Malley: Anderson, Snowden put a lot of Americans lives at risk. Snowden broke the law. Whistle blowers do not run to Russia and try to get protection from Putin. If he really believes that, he should be back here.
Bernie Sanders
U.S. Senator (I- Vermont),
CNNW 10/13/2015
Cooper: Senator Sanders? Edward Snowden? Sanders: I think Snowden played a very important role in educating the American people to the degree tin which our civil liberties and our Constitutional rights are being under minded. Cooper: Is he a hero? Sanders: He did break the law and I think there should be a penalty to that but I think what he did in educating us should be taken into consideration before he is (inaudible).
Jim Webb
Former U.S. Senator (D- VA)
CNNW 10/13/2015
Cooper: Senator Webb? Edward Snowden. Webb: I would leave his ultimate judgment to the legal system. Here’s what I do believe. We have a serious problem in terms of the collection of personal information in this country. One of the things that I did during the FISA Bill in 2007, The Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, was introduced with Russ Feingold 2 amendments basically saying we understand the realities of how you have to collect this broad information in the internet age but after a certain period of time you need to destroy the personal information that you have if people have not been, if criminal justice proceedings have not been brought against them. We have a vast data bank of information that is ripe for people with bad intentions to be able to use and they need to be destroyed.
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